Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
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BMB Welcomes Dr. Joyce Jose

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Joyce Jose

The BMB Department extends a warm welcome to Dr. Joyce Jose. Dr. Jose joined the Department in January 2017 and she is working on setting up her lab on the second floor of the Millennium Science Complex.

Visit Dr. Jose's profile page.

Joyce Jose, an assistant professor of biochemistry and molecular biology, joins the faculty of the Huck Institutes and the Eberly College of Science.

Dr. Jose comes to Penn State and the Huck Institutes from Purdue University, where she was an assistant research scientist in the Department of Biological Sciences and the operations manager for the biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) select agent labs.

Jose received her bachelor’s degree in zoology, with emphases on botany and chemistry, from Newman College in Thodupuzha, Kerala, India; her master’s in biotechnology from Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam, Kerala, India; and her doctorate in biotechnology from Madurai Kamaraj University, Tamil Nadu, India. She completed her postdoctoral research with Dr. Richard Kuhn at the Markey Center for Structural Biology at Purdue, where she also held a position as a research associate.

Jose’s expertise is in molecular virology and structure-function studies, specifically those involved in the replication and assembly of alphaviruses and flaviviruses. She also specializes in analysis of virus-induced structures and cytoskeleton modification in mammalian host and insect vectors using high-resolution live cell imaging and electron microscopy, and in working with viral determinants of neurotropism and persistence in BSL-3 pathogens. Jose’s lab is interested in understanding the pathogenesis of mosquito-borne alphaviruses and flaviviruses such as dengue, Zika, West Nile and chikungunya virus. Using tools from reverse genetics, molecular biology, and microscopy, the Jose Lab investigates the virus-host and virus-vector interactions involved in virus entry, modification of the host system for virus replication, and dissemination, with the long-term goal of understanding the host molecular pathways that impact virus lifecycle in order to develop new strategies to control and combat viral pathogens.

Please stop by W-206 and visit her lab in W-213 & W-214 Millennium Science Complex to meet Dr. Jose and welcome her and her lab's research.