Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Penn State Science
You are here: Home Graduate BMMB Course Archive 2017 Fall 2017 BMMB BMMB 525 Fall 2017 BMMB 525 Fall 2017 Syllabus

BMMB 525 Fall 2017 Syllabus

Main Content

CHEM 525 / BMMB 525 / FRNSC 831

Analytical Separations / Forensic Chemistry II

 


Welcome to a course that goes by many names: CHEM 525, BMMB 525 and FRNSC 831 (lecture portion).  These courses are specifically known as Analytical Separations or Forensic Chemistry II depending on which department you are coming in from. I’ll be the instructor for this course (Frank Dorman).

Our Course Goals: Many scientists in various analytical settings across the globe use gas and liquid chromatographic separations, as well as others, as the critical step in the identification and quantification of trace organic compounds.  Unfortunately most of these practicing chromatographers view the techniques that they use as little more than “black boxes” and really do not understand how these techniques truly operate.  The goal of this course is two-fold: First, to gain a solid fundamental understanding of modern separation science and the more common techniques employed in analytical laboratory settings. Second, you should be able to use this understanding to teach others, and act as an “expert” in your area of science, both to other chromatographers, and also to non-scientists.

 

Contact Information:

Frank L. Dorman, 240 Chemistry Building, fld3@psu.edu, 863-6805

Office Hours: By appointment – contact me J

 

You may also check at my research labs in 347, 344a, 314 and 434 Davey Labs

 

Conner Stultz, 213 Chemistry Building, cvs5691@psu.edu, 865-1732 – Course TA

 

Learning Philosophy:

Learning is not effective if it is passive.  Both the instructor and the students need to actively participate in the course, and this requires communication in both directions.  I have planned to cover a large amount of material, both in a formalized lecture, and also suggested outside readings. Please plan to be engaged and “pull” for more information and clarification.  You should also feel invited to push the course and the instructor into additional or different areas of interest as long as they fit into the general theme of this course.  A percentage of your final grade will be from a subjective assessment of your level of participation throughout the course.  Let’s all become more knowledgeable as separations scientists together!

 

 

Exams and Grading:

Exams will consist of three equally weighted exams as scheduled below.  Exam material will be taken from text, lecture, and outside literature cited, not just concepts covered in the lectures alone. In addition to the three exams, there will be a presentation from each student during the term.  The presentation will be a literature review on a current technique or topic that is to be presented to the class as instructional.

 

Exam #1                                  27%

Exam #2                                  27%

Exam #3                                  27%

Student presentation               14%

Participation factor                  5%

Total          100%

 

Exam Policy:

Other than unexpected illnesses, all requests for a makeup exam must be made by email to Dr. Dorman no later than two weeks prior to the scheduled exam.  If an unexpected illness keeps a student from attending the exam, an email must be sent to Dr. Dorman prior to the class period in order for the student to be allowed to take a makeup exam.  NOTE: Makeup exams may be harder than the scheduled exam, so plan accordingly and stay healthy! J

 

The exams will be a combination of short written answer and multiple choice/True and False.  Students should practice both verbalizing and writing out their understanding of the course material.  Using each approach will help in their preparation for the exams.  The exams will be open-resource, take-home format and will be designed to evaluate the student’s ability to apply the material covered in the course, and not merely to determine if the student is able to regurgitate the information.  In this regard, it is likely that the exams will require extension of the course material, and may also require problem solving not directly covered as examples in the lecture itself.  In other words, reference materials will likely need to be consulted in addition to the lecture notes and text itself.

 

 

The Student Presentation:

Each student will choose a currently relevant topic in the area of analytical separations.  Each student will prepare to cover a 25-minute lecture period (up to 2 students per period) where you should plan for 20 minutes of formalized lecture, with some time for questions. Your goal is to teach the class about your topic.  You may use any medium available (blackboard, overhead, PowerPoint, handouts, etc…) the delivery of the content will not count as much as the content itself.  Keep in mind that the level of this presentation is to analytical chemistry-focused graduate students, and should be rigorous. The grades will, in-part, be determined from peer evaluation. Each presenter will also provide an exam question to the instructor, prior to their presentation, which is intended to gauge the other students understanding of the topic for possible inclusion on an upcoming exam. Presentations will occur throughout the term, typically at the beginning of lecture periods.  Topics are to be determined by each student in consultation with the instructor, but a list of possibilities will be distributed.  There is an advantage to choosing you topic early, and the choice of topic does impact when will be appropriate for you to give the presentation.  These will, therefore, be scheduled as the topics are chosen, and as we move through the term.

 

 

This semester, we will meet:

Monday, Wednesday and Friday 1:25PM – 2:15PM, 102 Chemistry Building

 

Required Text:

C. F. Poole, The Essence of Chromatography. Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2003. ISBN:0444501991

 

Additional resources, Citations given in the course are expected to be read and understood.  These are all available through the PSU library system, Angel and as handouts during the course, depending on the reference.

 

Learning Objectives: Achieved through lectures, recitation sessions and your hard work, and assessed through exams, Presentations and class participation

 

PLEASE READ THE LEARNING OBJECTIVES

A greater understanding of

 

  • General Concepts in Column Chromatography

Family tree of chromatographic methods, principles of retention and band broadening,

resolution, separation speed, and column design

 

  • Sample Preparation Concepts

Goals of the sample prep process, gas, liquid and solid sample techniques, solvent

extraction, concentration, sample dilution, solvent-less methods and method

development

 

  • Column in Gas Chromatography

Evolution of column design, mobile phase properties, stationary phase properties and

selection, retention mechanisms, column preparation and evaluation, and method

development

 

  • Instrumental Aspects of Gas Chromatography

Pneumatic systems, thermal zones, sample inlets, multidimensional chromatography,

comprehensive chromatography, and detectors

 

  • Column in Liquid Chromatography

Preparation and properties of column packings, column preparation and evaluation,

retention mechanisms, and method development

 

  • Instrumental Aspects of Liquid Chromatography

Solvent delivery systems, sample inlets, temperature control, coupled column systems,

detectors, and indirect detection

 

  • Other Separation Techniques

TLC, SFC, Electrophoresis, other hyphenated techniques

 

  • Special Topics

To be determined through class input, time available, and possible outside experts.

 

 

Academic Integrity:

Academic integrity is an essential component of your education. The following is a quote from the “PSU Faculty Senate Policies for Students” - Academic integrity “is the pursuit of scholarly activity free from fraud and deception and is an educational objective of this institution.  Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, cheating, plagiarizing, fabricating of information or citations, facilitating acts of academic dishonesty by others, having unauthorized possession of examinations, submitting work of another person or work previously used without informing the instructor, or tampering with the academic work of other students.”  All University and Eberly College of Science policies regarding academic integrity/academic dishonesty apply to this course and the students enrolled in this course.  Refer to the following URL for further details on the academic integrity policies of the Eberly College of Science:

http://science.psu.edu/current-students/Integrity/Policy.html

 

Matters of academic dishonesty will be turned over to the University disciplinary system and may result in a failing grade for the course.

 

Disability Policy:

Penn State welcomes students with disabilities into the University's educational programs. If you have a disability-related need for reasonable academic adjustments in this course, contact the Office for Disability Services (ODS) at 814-863-1807. For further information regarding ODS, please visit the Office for Disability Services Web site at http://equity.psu.edu/ods/.

In order to receive consideration for course accommodations, you must contact ODS and provide documentation (see the documentation guidelines at http://equity.psu.edu/ods/guidelines/documentation-guidelines). If the documentation supports the need for academic adjustments, ODS will provide a letter identifying appropriate academic adjustments. Please share this letter and discuss the adjustments with your instructor as early in the course as possible. You must contact ODS and request academic adjustment letters at the beginning of each semester.

 

Mutual Respect and Cooperation:

The Eberly College of Science Code of Mutual Respect and Cooperation (http://science.psu.edu/climate/code-of-mutual-respect-and-cooperation/Code-of-Mutual-Respect%20final.pdf/view) embodies the values that we hope our faculty, staff, and students possess and will endorse to make The Eberly College of Science a place where every individual feels respected and valued, as well as challenged and rewarded.

 

How to be Successful in this Course:

Be prepared for class by studying/ reviewing the lecture material, and by reading the assigned chapters of the textbook and the assigned journal articles.  Come to every class, ask questions, and schedule one-on-one meetings with Dr. Dorman if you’re struggling with the course material.  Make sure you understand the material, as the exams will NOT be a series of multiple choice questions designed to test recall only.


Tentative Agenda, subject to change (read: likely)

DATE

TOPIC

21 AUG 17

Introduction

Fundamentals of Separations

Phase Distributions

Dioxin 2017 Symposium FLD out

23 AUG 17

Fundamentals of Separations

Phase Distributions

25 AUG 17

Fundamentals of Separations

Phase Distributions

28 AUG 17

Fundamentals of Separations

Distribution Ratio/equilibrium/thermo

30 AUG 17

Fundamentals of Separations

Distribution Ratio/equilibrium/thermo

1 SEP 17

Fundamentals of Separations

Extraction

4 SEP 17

LABOR DAY  - No Class

6 SEP 17

Fundamentals of Separations

Extraction

8 SEP 17

Fundamentals of Separations

Extraction

11 SEP 17

Fundamentals of Separations

Peak Shapes and measurements

13 SEP 17

Fundamentals of Separations

Peak Shapes and measurements

15 SEP 17

Fundamentals of Separations

Mass Transport/Diffusion

18 SEP 17

Fundamentals of Separations

Mass Transport/Diffusion

20 SEP 17

Column Chromatography

Pressure and Flow

22 SEP 17

Column Chromatography

Pressure and Flow

25 SEP 17

Column Chromatography

Resolution

EXAM 1 Distributed

27 SEP 17

Column Chromatography

Resolution

29 SEP 17

Gas Chromatography

General Instrumentation

EXAM 1 Due

2 OCT 17

Gas Chromatography

General Instrumentation

4 OCT 17

Gas Chromatography

Injectors/Inlet Systems

6 OCT 17

Gas Chromatography

Columns

9 OCT 17

Gas Chromatography

Columns

11 OCT 17

Gas Chromatography

Non-MS Detectors

13 OCT 17

Gas Chromatography

Applications

16 OCT 17

Gas Chromatography

Applications

18 OCT 17

Liquid Chromatography

General Instrumentation

20 OCT 17

Liquid Chromatography

Injectors

23 OCT 17

Liquid Chromatography

Columns

25 OCT 17

Liquid Chromatography

Non-MS Detectors

27 OCT 17

Liquid Chromatography

Applications

30 OCT 17

 

Mass Spectrometers as Detectors

GC Ion sources

EXAM 2 Distributed

1 NOV 17

Mass Spectrometers as Detectors

HPLC Ion Sources

3 NOV 17

Mass Spectrometers as Detectors

Mass Analyzer Types

EXAM 2 Due

6 NOV 17

Method Development

Chromatographic Modeling

8 NOV 17

Method Development

Chromatographic Modeling/Applications

10 NOV 17

Method Development

QA/QC

13 NOV 17

Electrophoretic Separations

15 NOV 17

Electrophoretic Separations

17 NOV 17

Chiral Separations

20 NOV 17

THANKSGIVING BREAK

22 NOV 17

THANKSGIVING BREAK

24 NOV 17

THANKSGIVING BREAK

27 NOV 17

Comprehensive and Multidimensional Chromatography

29 NOV 17

Comprehensive and Multidimensional Chromatography

1 DEC 17

Special Topics

 

4 DEC 17

Special Topics

EXAM 3 Distributed

6 DEC 17

Special Topics

8 DEC 17

TBD

EXAM 3 Due